The 3 Most Important Words!

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The three most important words that a child can hear are I LOVE YOU!

Here are some great ways to use the written word to express your love and to promote literacy at the same time:

A poet and didn’t know-it
You don’t have to be a poet to write a poem for your child. If poetry isn’t your thing, look up simple children’s rhymes and make revisions especially for your child. Poems can be serious or fun, but either way, your child will love it.

 

A Valentine welcome
Welcome your child home from school with a Valentine banner across your front porch or entryway. Add cute sayings that remind him why he’s the greatest son; create fun sentences by clipping words from magazine ads; and add some Valentine doodles.

Snail mail surprise
Kids love to get mail, so why not send your child a card, letter or postcard. Don’t forget to let him check the mail to discover the greeting himself.

Say it with e-mail
Send your child an e-mail with a link to a fun Web site or a funny animated e-greeting. With the abundance of entertaining Web sites and free e-greetings, you can send your child something new every day of the year.

Scrabble greetings
Wish your child a “Happy Valentine’s Day,” congratulate him on a great report card or show how much you appreciate his help by creating a Scrabble message. For younger readers, spell out a simple phrase leaving a space between words. For older kids, make them figure out your greeting. Intersect the words as you would in playing Scrabble and see if they can solve the message.

C is for . . .
Make a poster portraying your child’s characteristics. Put her name at the top, and then list as many positive descriptive words as you can that begin with her initial. Use a thesaurus to find oodles of words. (Example: Cassandra, cute, caring, creative, crafty, curious.) When you finish, laminate or frame it, and hang it in her room.

Poetry praise
Give your child a poetry book written especially for sons or daughters. “To My Son with Love” or “To My Daughter with Love on the Important Things in Life,” written by Susan Polis Schultz, offer encouragement and a new understanding of your love and commitment. Don’t forget to add your inscription inside.
- See more at: http://www.charlotteparent.com/articlemain.php?Creative-Ways-to-Tell-Your-Child-I-Love-You-2350#sthash.UM64UtHA.dpuf

A poet and didn’t know-it
You don’t have to be a poet to write a poem for your child. If poetry isn’t your thing, look up simple children’s rhymes and make revisions especially for your child. Poems can be serious or fun, but either way, your child will love it.

A Valentine welcome
Welcome your child home from school with a Valentine banner across your front porch or entryway. Add cute sayings that remind him why he’s the greatest son; create fun sentences by clipping words from magazine ads; and add some Valentine doodles.

Snail mail surprise
Kids love to get mail, so why not send your child a card, letter or postcard. Don’t forget to let him check the mail to discover the greeting himself.

Say it with e-mail
Send your child an e-mail with a link to a fun Web site or a funny animated e-greeting. With the abundance of entertaining Web sites and free e-greetings, you can send your child something new every day of the year.

Scrabble greetings
Wish your child a “Happy Valentine’s Day,” congratulate him on a great report card or show how much you appreciate his help by creating a Scrabble message. For younger readers, spell out a simple phrase leaving a space between words. For older kids, make them figure out your greeting. Intersect the words as you would in playing Scrabble and see if they can solve the message.

C is for . . .
Make a poster portraying your child’s characteristics. Put her name at the top, and then list as many positive descriptive words as you can that begin with her initial. Use a thesaurus to find oodles of words. (Example: Cassandra, cute, caring, creative, crafty, curious.) When you finish, laminate or frame it, and hang it in her room.

Poetry praise
Give your child a poetry book written especially for sons or daughters. “To My Son with Love” or “To My Daughter with Love on the Important Things in Life,” written by Susan Polis Schultz, offer encouragement and a new understanding of your love and commitment. Don’t forget to add your inscription inside.

 

There are some wonderful children's books available written about love that will touch the heart of any age:

Guess How Much I Love You     By: Sam McBratney
Word Count: 374
New Words to Discover:  reached, lane, trunk, thornbushes

 

Snuggle Puppy      By: Sandra Boynton
Word Count: 170
New Words to Discover: especially, snuggle

 

Love You Forever    By: Robert Munsch
Word Count: 768
New Words to Discover: strange, teenager

 

The Kissing Hand     By: Audrey Penn
Word Count: 491
New Words to Discover:  nuzzled, strange, wonderful, interested, palm, tingled, toasty, wrapped, thoughtful, familiar, scamper

 

 

 

"We can only learn to love by loving" - Iris Murcoch

  
Target Age
0-3 , 3-6 , 6-12
Focus
Engagement , 2000 Words to Grow
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